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The Journal of Sonic Studies
Journal of Sonic Studies, volume 6, nr. 1 (January 2014)Iain McGregor; Phil Turner; David Benyon: USING PARTICIPATORY VISUALISATION OF SOUNDSCAPES TO COMPARE DESIGNERS’ AND LISTENERS’ EXPERIENCES OF SOUND DESIGNS

To refer to this article use this url: http://journal.sonicstudies.org/vol06/nr01/a08

Notes

1. “Awareness” and “spatial” were not recorded as the listeners were asked to listen until they were aware of each sound event prior to questioning. Listeners were also not questioned about the spatial aspects, as each sound event was presented in isolation, normally they are part of an appliance. Whenever awareness or spatialisation is missing from a table it is due to listeners not being questioned about the two attributes.

2. A full statistical analysis was not carried out at this stage as it was clear there were significant differences in responses and that the attributes should be tested individually in further studies. This point in mentioned as part of further work. A brief statistical analysis is reported below, and highlights were the results are significant.

3. As the Spatial attribute had more than three options it has been excluded from table 17.

4. For this we used the Fischer’s exact test which is a measure of statistical significance used when the numbers involved are small. Designers’ and listeners’ responses for 12 of the attributes (excluding Spatial) where compared for each of the 10 sound designs, which resulted in 120 conditions.

5. It was expected that there would be a wide range of responses, and the surprise was that in certain conditions the results were so similar. The main purpose of the tool is to highlight differences so that designs can be improved, rather than confirming that a design is successful. Familiarity with content has been shown to alter what listeners attend to. The designs mentioned in this section were not discussed in depth as the focus of the paper is on highlighting differences in perception.

Dr. Iain McGregor is the programme leader for the online Sound Design MSc at Edinburgh Napier University, where he also runs the Auralisation suite. After working as a live sound engineer and sound designer he moved into education, where he has taught about sound and sound design for the last 23 years. His research concentrates on listeners’ experiences of sound, and he is always keen to collaborate on listening studies.

David Benyon is Professor of Human-Computer Systems and director of the Centre for Interaction Design at Edinburgh Napier University, UK. He is also director of Interdisciplinary Research in the Faculty of Engineering, Computing and the Creative Industries. Prof. Benyon has been working in the area of human-computer interaction (HCI) and interaction design for over 25 years. He has written widely on the subject with over 150 referred publications covering HCI, interaction design and intelligent user interfaces. He published one of the first textbooks on HCI in 1994 and recently completed the third edition of the textbook Designing Interactive Systems: a comprehensive guide to human-computer interaction and interaction design (Pearson, 2013).